Engineers Wanted for a Great Journey with a Noble Cause

Written by Brandon Tseng, Co-Founder & COO

 

“In classic times, the courageous struggle for a noble cause was considered success in itself. Sadly, that ideal has been forgotten. But it is well worth remembering.” - John Wooden, 11-time National Championship Coach

 

Two things make a journey great and worthwhile no matter the outcome:

1)     The adversity faced along the way. The more daunting the trials, the better, more interesting, and more fulfilling the journey will be.

2)     The friendships you make along the path. The bonds forged among the teammates who accompany you. The greater the adversity faced, the stronger these bonds become.

 

Think about it: No one would care about the Wizard of Oz if Dorothy traveled the Yellow Brick Road by herself and reached the end without any trouble. No one would watch Frodo Baggins walk to Mt. Doom solo and unscathed.

 

What matters is the path, the learning, and the growth.

 

IMG_0859.jpg

When I was ten years old, after watching the movie “The Rock,” I decided I wanted to be a U.S. Navy SEAL. This desire to serve grew even more after 9/11 and put me on a path that eventually led to BUD/S and SEAL Qualification Training (SQT). During BUD/S and SQT, I found myself tested in all kinds of ways. And the truth was that at the end of training, I realized that the reward was not the Trident I received when officially becoming a SEAL, but the tests we faced along the way. Every time my teammates and I were tested, regardless of the outcome (because in SEAL training you fail many times), we grew closer as teammates and learned more about what we were made of. And while it may sound counterintuitive, the days I spent being miserably cold, wet, and tired while training alongside my teammates were some of the most fulfilling and, rewarding, of my life.  

 

Along the way I learned a lot about leadership. And what Wooden calls “the courageous struggle for a noble cause.”  

 

I found that the best leaders do these three things:

 

1) Lead to serve others.

Everything is about what’s best for the team. It’s not about you, it's about the person to your left and to your right. When you concern yourself wholly with the well-being of the team, the rest takes care of itself.  

 

2) Lead with a boundless amount of positive energy and enthusiasm.

Energy and enthusiasm is required to inspire your teammates, and inspired teammates are truly unstoppable. Enthusiasm and energy are also contagious -- and makes both work and life outside of work really fun.

 

3) Lead by example.

You can only ask of the team what you have done and will continue to do yourself. You must earn the right to lead and your spot on the team every single day.   

 

DSC00283-2.jpg

And the best leaders don’t look for easy journeys. They seek out the harder path, a “courageous struggle” abundant with adversity. And when this adversity is faced head-on by a team, something much greater than any one individual could have accomplished on their own is achieved.

 

My own journey in the Navy led me to found Shield AI.  It pushed me to think about what we could be doing to use technology to solve some incredibly hard, dangerous problems. We’ve made great progress because of a truly amazing team focused on a shared mission. There’s a way to go ahead of us, and the journey is just getting underway.

 

So what’s the great journey we’re on? To protect service members and innocent civilians with artificially intelligent systems.

 

How hard will it be? Incredibly hard. It has never been done before.

 

What does it take? Most importantly, a mindset that is committed to being great and conditioned to love the struggle. Along the way you will become a better, stronger person on a great journey with truly amazing teammates pushing you onward, together.

Screen Shot 2018-07-23 at 10.43.41 AM.png
Michele Maley